new artists

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I am adding two artists to my links, Erin Morrison and Sarah Spitler. Both are draftswomen working with a variety of media who are creating quite interesting work.

Morrison’s landscapes focus on nature’s adaptive relationship to the man made inorganic. Morrison pushes her images past realism into abstraction to emphasize nature’s transformation, all the while keeping small remnants of the the familiar, representational aspects of nature and industry to remind the viewer of the reality of the conceptual issue. Morrison aims to reconnect the viewer with the subject on an emotional, empathetic level by referencing photography but eliminating the separative camera lens.

$2300 / 1br 1bath LUXURY, STEAM ROOM, CITY VIEWS!: Brooklyn, NY (2008)

$2300 / 1br 1bath LUXURY, STEAM ROOM, CITY VIEWS!: Brooklyn, NY (2008)

Mixed wet and dry media on Arches Aquarelle

24″ x 32″

Spitler’s work is non-representational. Spitler explores the paint, ink, and other media, layering one on top of the other, and often mixing them, in what she describes as the search for the “emergence of fragments of imagery in relation to a destructive force”. Her work aims to serve as an analogy to the often destructive relationship between the permanent and ephemeral in nature.

Vorticital Obsolescence

Vorticital Obsolescence (2008)

Ink, acrylic, and enamel on Mylar

16″ x 16″

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setback

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camera1

So, (sigh) I got my first setback of the summer. As I said in an earlier post, one of my goals right now is to take more photographs. Well, today I discovered that my camera is broken, obviously placing a rather large roadblock in the way of my goal.

I was headed outside to take some photographs of my most recent drawings this afternoon, and my camera, despite freshly charged batteries, just wouldn’t turn on. Now, the last camera I had seemed to go downhill in the same manner as this camera seems to have. That is, it was not accidentally dropped or left out in the sun for long periods of time; nothing happened to it. Simply, after a long period of unuse, it wouldn’t turn on. The same is true for this camera: it wasn’t even touched, and just wouldn’t come on (my previous post is evidence of this fact)!

So, now my goal will have to wait, either until my camera decides to wake up from its inconvenient hibernation, or until I can afford a new camera. I am not anticipating either to happen overnight, although I would take it, without question.

(If any reader could clue me into what might be ailing my poor camera, I would be tremendously grateful.)